Bruce Lee's Cousin


INT. BILLY’S BEDROOM. DAY

BILLY LEE writes a screenplay at his desk. His narrow eyes reveal a hint of an Asian heritage, but everything else about him is very American. His mind is knee-deep in concentration.

BILLY (V.O.)
I was a little worried about death. Afraid I was gonna die without leaving my mark in the world. 27 years in and my life had been absolutely meaningless. 


EXT. PARK. DAY

BILLY sits on a bench like FOREST GUMP. He opens a box of chocolates and places one in his mouth. 

BILLY (V.O.)
As Forest Gump would say, it had been like a box of chocolates. Only I always knew what I was gonna get: shit... 

He spits out the candy, puckering his cheeks from the bitterness.

BILLY (V.O.)
...nothing but shit. That’s right, my existence had been about as productive as a digestive system. If I were to die right then, at that moment, I swear you would’ve never known I’d lived. 


INT. SUPERMARKET - DELI. DAY

BILLY cuts some cold meat on a slicing machine.

BILLY (V.O.)
With the exception of bodily waste, all I had contributed to society were a few thousand pounds of cold cuts.


INT. BILLY’S BEDROOM. DAY

BILLY sits in the dark watching BRUCE LEE’S Game of Death. LEE fakes his death by putting blanks in a gun.

BILLY (V.O.)
The only thing that made me feel special was being the 8th cousin of Bruce Lee, a biological fact that I felt was necessary to remind my friends of every few days or so.


INT. BILLY’S BEDROOM. DAY

BILLY sits in a dimly lit corner paging through a photo album.
The first page has a small picture of BILLY in the center pocket.

BILLY (V.O.)
I hadn’t had a girlfriend in about five years. Every class of female had rejected me...from the Mississippi Wandas to the Hollywood Blairs.
He turns through several blank pages before getting to another sleeve with a picture of himself. He has no other photos of family or friends to fill in the blank slots.

BILLY (V.O.)
Needless to say, I had no kids and really no hope of having any. I could’ve adopted if I wanted to, but I saw no purpose in raising children that weren't my offspring. The only reason I wanted to have kids was to leave a piece of me behind after I died. 

After another couple of blank pages, we see yet another photo of BILLY, but with a picture of BRUCE LEE next to it (probably cut out from some book or magazine).

BILLY (V.O.)
So if sons and daughters were out of the question, what else could I have created that would outlive the shortness of my life-span? 


INT. ART STUDIO. DAY

BILLY sits on a stool with a french beret, rubbing his goatee with his fingers. An easel is set up just in front of him. He looks like the stereotypical abstract thinker.  

BILLY (V.O.)
Yeah, I know, art seemed to be the next best thing.
The stool collapses and BILLY falls flat on his face.

BILLY (V.O.)
But I was about as artistic as the producer of those Girls Gone Wild videos on a bad day.


INT. SUPERMARKET - BREAK ROOM. DAY

BILLY pages through a tabloid magazine at a table in the corner. We see a headline reading, “Michael Richards spotted picking trash from Santa Monica dumpster.”

BILLY (V.O.)
It hit me one day, though, when I was paging through a tabloid during one of my 15 minute breaks. All the people in this country really cared about were sensational stories...

He turns the page and we see a letter written by an avid reader. Our attention is drawn to one particular sentence that reads, “I read your magazine more than the bible.”

 BILLY (V.O.)
...not art. I just needed some way to draw eyes, make the story of my life sensational. My life story would outlive the shortness of my life-span.


INT. TV STUDIO. DAY (FANTASY SEQUENCE)

BILLY sits in an arm chair on a small stage, talking to an INTERVIEWER. He is wearing some gaudy getup to denote his fame and importance.

BILLY
I was probably your stereotypical loser. You know, living alone with my grandmother, working thirty hours at a supermarket, eating Hungry Man TV dinners every night, Little Debbie donuts for dessert.   


INT. BILLY’S BEDROOM - BED. NIGHT

BILLY lies awake in bed, staring at the ceiling.

BILLY (V.O.)
The question was what to become. I needed to go from loser to...something special.


INT. TV STUDIO. DAY (FANTASY SEQUENCE)

INTERVIEWER
So when did you decide to become a novelist?


INT. BILLY’S BED. NIGHT

BILLY
Failed English. Couldn’t even fake that. 


INT. TV STUDIO. DAY (FANTASY SEQUENCE)

INTERVIEWER
It must of taken a lot of guts to take that leap of faith into proctology?


INT. BILLY’S BED. NIGHT

BILLY
Why would somebody want to examine butts for a living?


INT. TV STUDIO. DAY (FANTASY SEQUENCE)

INTERVIEWER
How did you train to become an expert at looking up women’s dresses?


INT. BILLY’S BED. NIGHT

BILLY
All right, now. Let’s not get silly.


INT. TV STUDIO. DAY (FANTASY SEQUENCE)

INTERVIEWER
Can you remember the day you picked up that camera and just knew you wanted to be a filmmaker?


INT. BILLY’S BED. NIGHT

BILLY sits up and the light bulb turns on.

BILLY
Filmmaker...


INT. BILLY’S BEDROOM. DAY

BILLY opens the top drawer to his dresser and throws the tabloid from work on top of a dusty bible.

BILLY (V.O.)
After all, it was in my genes.

He sits down at his desk and writes “Ext. Graveyard. Day” on the first page of a yellow legal pad.

BILLY (V.O.)
Nobody gave a shit about painters or writers. All anyone in this country cared about was the movies.


INT. BILLY’S KITCHEN. DAY

BILLY dials a number on his phone.

We hear a shrill voice at the other end of the line.

BILLY
Hi, is Keith there? It’s Billy. Billy Lee.

The refrigerator hum permeates a moment of silence.

BILLY
Keith. What’s up?
(pause)
Listen. I’m gonna be making a film.
(pause)
Yeah, well do you wanna be...? What do ya mean? I’ve always LOVED movies. And you know how I’m related to Bruce Lee and everything.
(pause)
Yeah, call up Kenny and have ‘em meet us at my pla...no, we DON’T need any soda. We’re gonna have to concentrate, OK? Right. Bye.


INT. TV STUDIO. DAY (FANTASY SEQUENCE)

BILLY, dressed again in his flashy clothing, talks to the INTERVIEWER with elaborate gestures like the typical artist would.

BILLY
So it was guerilla filmmaking from that point onward, you know? We just started down this road of amateur production and never looked back.


EXT. GRAVEYARD. NIGHT

BILLY holds a video camera in his hand. He wears a black trench coat and a spooky strap-on Pinocchio nose. 

He directs KEITH and KENNY, both in their late 20s. KEITH sips a soda while he listens to his directions and KENNY fiddles with his rat-tail.

BILLY (O.S.)
My first project was this movie called Gutter. It wasn’t anything special. Gutter was one of those films that I needed to make just to, you know, get it out of my system. 


INT. TV STUDIO. DAY (FANTASY SEQUENCE)

BILLY (CONT’D)
Every filmmaker needs to make one film at first that...embodies all those cliched scenarios that you loved so much as a kid. 

The INTERVIEWER nods his head in agreement, wearing a mask of awe.


INT. BILLY’S GARAGE. DAY

Now we see BILLY dressed as “DINGO,” the protagonist of his next film. He points an automatic pistol toward KEITH and KENNY, dressed as PRISTINE and KADO (DINGO’S enemies).

BILLY (O.S.)
My next project was a film called British Dingo from Ireland. The title came out of my inability to speak in a British accent without sounding Australian or Irish.


INT. TV STUDIO. DAY (FANTASY SEQUENCE)

The AUDIENCE and the INTERVIEWER roar in laughter from what BILLY just said.

BILLY (CONT’D)
So I decided to write the ‘Dingo’ character as a hybrid. His mixture of ethnic blood represents his loss of identity in a country that’s been struggling to keep its sovereignty from the British.

The INTERVIEWER re-crosses his legs and folds his hands in his lap. These latter remarks have interested him immensely.

BILLY (CONT’D)
Of course, his Australian blood really made no sense whatsoever in that context, and that’s why the movie really wasn’t any good.

Sporadic belly laughs echo throughout the acoustics of the studio.


INT. CAR. DAY

KEITH and KENNY speed through some suburban streets.

BILLY (O.S.)
Then I decided that I wanted to do a movie with an exciting car chase. All my friends said I’d never pull it off, and they were right. But I tried anyway and the result was a film called Gas.


INT. A LIVING ROOM. DAY

KEITH and KENNY sit indian-style on the rug and play Mario Kart.

BILLY (O.S.)
Gas was about two kids who literally turn their fantasy world of video games into a reality. Their race in Mario Kart becomes a real-life car chase when the game between the friends turns sour.


INT. TV STUDIO. DAY (FANTASY SEQUENCE)

The INTERVIEWER rubs his chin sophisticatedly.

INTERVIEWER
So that film was kind of a response to the cultural conundrum regarding media’s influence on our youth. 

BILLY
Yes, precisely.


INT. BILLY’S BEDROOM. DAY

BILLY finishes up his newest screenplay.

BILLY (V.O.)
So with three films under my belt, I had just finished the script to my fourth.

BILLY finishes writing ‘The End’ and places the title page on top of the pile of paper. It reads, ‘Man with a Video Camera.’


EXT. A BUSH. DAY

BILLY sets up his camera ten feet away from it. 

BILLY (V.O.)
But it didn’t take me long to realize that making another movie like Gutter or Gas wouldn’t get me anywhere. 

KEITH and KENNY, dressed as middle-aged suburbanites, wait to the side for BILLY’S cue.

BILLY (V.O.)
Nobody had really seen my films other than Keith and Kenny. If I wanted to get recognized, I would have to stir the soup a little.


INT. BILLY’S BEDROOM. NIGHT

BILLY sits in the dark. The blue flickers from the television illuminate his face. 
He watches Ed Wood’s Plan 9 from Outer Space.

BILLY (V.O.)
While most filmmakers idolized Hitchcock or Kubrick, I really started to admire Ed Wood. He was a loser like myself and a horrible filmmaker (like myself), but still managed to leave a permanent mark in film history.


INT. BILLY’S BEDROOM. NIGHT (AN HOUR LATER)

BILLY ejects Plan 9 and pops in Glen or Glenda.

BILLY (V.O.)
It wasn’t that his movies were the worst films ever. I mean, everybody’s brother was making B-movie crap at that time. He was famous because of his idiosyncrasies... 

We see a close-up of ED WOOD dressed as GLENDA.

BILLY (V.O.)
...mainly his transvestism. He made me realize that the only way I’d draw eyes was if I adopted some kind of wacky quirk.


EXT. A BUSH. DAY

BILLY finishes the camera setup and walks over to his actors.

BILLY
This is scene four. You guys are chasing after the monster. You hide behind the bush once it stops. Any questions? 

KEITH AND KENNY
Nope.

BILLY walks back to the camera and glues his eye to the viewfinder intensely.

BILLY
OK. Quiet on the set. Ready and... ACTION!!

KEITH and KENNY run up to the bush and walk casually behind it like the bad actors that they are.

BILLY
Cut! Come out. Come out.

KEITH and KENNY, both abashed, slowly emerge from behind the leaves.

BILLY
What was THAT?!

KEITH
Sorry, Billy. Let’s do it again.

BILLY
No...I can’t take this anymore.

KENNY
What’s the matter?

BILLY
I have to be...comfortable.

He rips off his shirt in one motion, revealing a fashionable Victoria Secret brassiere stuffed with socks. 

BILLY (V.O.)
As you see, I wasn’t very creative in establishing that quirk.

KEITH and KENNY stare at the brassiere in dismay.


EXT. BILLY’S DRIVEWAY. DAY

KEITH and KENNY sit in lawn chairs within the frame of the garage door.

BILLY adjusts the height of the tripod in front of them.

BILLY (V.O.)
No, copying Ed Wood definitely wasn’t gonna work. I needed to think of other ways to get attention.

BILLY finishes setting up his camera and moves toward his actors.

BILLY
So I’ll count to three and then I’ll point at you. I want you to turn your heads simultaneously and look at the monster crawling out of the sewer.

KEITH
So we turn our heads on three?

BILLY
No, I count to three and then I cue you. Got it?

KEITH
Yahp.

BILLY positions himself behind his camera and frames his shot. 

BILLY
OK, guys. Quiet on the set. Get into positions. 

KEITH and KENNY contort their facial muscles into awkward poses. Their nerves have gotten the better of them.

BILLY (CONT’D)
OK. Annnnnddddd... ACTION!

KEITH and KENNY panic, turning their heads prematurely and out of sync.

BILLY
CUT!

BILLY takes a few steps back and puts his hands to his face in despair.

KEITH
Sorry, Billy.

Redness rushes into his face.

BILLY
God dammit, guys! Jesus Christ!

He kicks over the tripod, stomps into the garage and ignites an inferno of rage.


INT. TV STUDIO. DAY (FANTASY SEQUENCE)

KEITH now sits in the hot seat across from the INTERVIEWER. KEITH looks much more intelligent than we know him to be.

INTERVIEWER
So what was it like working with Billy as an actor?

KEITH
Billy was just psychotic some of the time. If something went wrong, even something real minor, he’d have these huge tantrums. One time, he even knocked over the tripod and smashed the camera in one big karate kick -- it must have been that Bruce Lee blood surfacing or something -- anyway, we had to wait a few months to shoot again because he didn’t have enough money for a new camera.

INTERVIEWER
So it must have been difficult for you as an actor to work with him?

KEITH
Oh, definitely, but Billy was really irresistible as an artist, you know? His artistic vision was like, like a magnet that sucked you into him. You would get so consumed by it that his personal idiosyncrasies became irrelevant. 


EXT. A STORM SEWER. DAY

BILLY is dressed in a black trench coat, holding a cheap video camera as a prop. He has a fake HITLER mustache stuck on to his upper lip.

BILLY (V.O.)
Painting myself as the angry artist wasn’t a bad idea, but it was too expensive. I went through cameras like Pam Anderson went through boyfriends. I needed to create attention in a less physical way.

KEITH and KENNY stand behind the tripod. KENNY is busy framing the shot while 

KEITH sips a 7-11 Big Gulp soda. 

BILLY demonstrates his movements so KENNY, now the cinematographer, will know the proper camera choreography.

BILLY
(to Kenny)
I’m gonna be curled up like this, OK? Then I’m going to slowly rise. Zoom in smoothly until you fill the frame with my Hitler mustache.


INT. TV STUDIO. DAY. (FANTASY SEQUENCE)

KENNY, now in the hot seat, sports an artsy Kappa hat on his head. 

KENNY
I think the thing I always admired the most about Billy was his audacity when it came to the content in his movies. He never avoided controversy. If he needed a character named Hitler in his film, he wouldn’t hesitate to write him in. He would never compromise anything essential to projecting his vision.

Next to KENNY is a MEDIA ANALYST from Syracuse University dressed in a shirt, tie and sweater vest. 

INTERVIEWER
Professor Matthews, would you care to comment on the politics of Lee’s films?

PROFESSOR
Well, a lot of filmmakers had gotten political before Billy, but nobody had been as truthful as he was, especially in Man with a Video Camera. He took the socio-cultural implications of Vertov’s film, not only updated them to fit the contemporary MTV pop-culture, but actually added new multi-leveled layers of social speculation.


EXT. BILLY’S DRIVEWAY. DAY

KEITH and KENNY sit in their lawn chairs at the end of the driveway. The camera is mounted on the tripod and unmanned. BILLY, dressed in his HITLER costume, sneaks up on them from across the street. He frames them within the viewfinder of his video camera (the prop).

BILLY (V.O.)
Soon, my friends began to get suspicious of my behavior.

BILLY creeps up behind his ACTORS and freezes for a moment.

BILLY
(quietly)
OK. Cut.

BILLY walks to the tripod to stop the tape and look at the footage.

KEITH and KENNY break out of character. KENNY nudges KEITH and glares at him.

KEITH shakes his head, reluctant to do whatever it is that KENNY wants him to do.

KENNY coaxes his buddy out of the chair.

KEITH
All right. OK.

BILLY studies the footage on the video camera’s small LCD screen. KEITH approaches him.

BILLY
(without looking up)
What is it, Keith?

KEITH
Uhhh...well, me and Kenny wanted to ask you...

BILLY calmly snaps the LCD screen back into the side of the camera and stands.

BILLY
Ask me what, Keith?

KEITH
Well, you’ve been acting kinda strange lately.

BILLY
(calmly)
Strange?

KENNY rises from his chair and joins the other two.

KENNY
Yeah, yesterday you were constantly throwing tantrums and today you’ve probably said about two words in the two hours that we’ve been shooting. 

BILLY’S eyebrows wrinkle in a sophist-like look of pensiveness. 

BILLY (V.O.)
That day, I was the elusive and introverted artist.

KENNY
And we never asked you why the hell you were wearing a bra the other day.

BILLY takes a moment to gather his thoughts.

BILLY
Guys, in the words of Shakespeare, “To thine own self be true, And it must follow, as the night the day, Thou canst not then be false to any man.” 

KEITH and KENNY stand there dumbfounded.


INT. TV STUDIO. DAY (FANTASY SEQUENCE)

KEITH sits in the hot seat again.

KEITH
...and I just stood there for a moment and absorbed what he said. That line just cleared up all the doubts Kenny and I had been having about Billy’s competency as a filmmaker. He was really a genius with words, you know? He would never talk much, but when he did, you would hear the most profound ideas ever spoken. 


EXT. BILLY’S DRIVEWAY. DAY

BILLY takes the tripod and puts it in place for a reverse-angle shot. He pauses for a moment and gathers his thoughts (genuinely this time). 

BILLY (V.O.)
No, Keith was right. I was acting ridiculous. Who was I to try and mold my life into a story?


INT. BILLY’S GARAGE. DAY

Two clamp lamps illuminate a small area of space. KEITH and KENNY stand near a dresser in the corner of the garage. BILLY, in costume, sets up the camera behind them.

BILLY (V.O.)
I decided to finish the film and let fate decide the rest. I couldn’t consciously Romanticize my life. It would just happen...

BILLY finishes the camera setup and walks within the frame of the open garage door. He has his prop camera in his hand. 

BILLY (V.O.)
...if it was meant to.

BILLY
OK, guys. This is the last shot of the movie. I’ve chased you into the garage. You’re trapped. There’s nowhere to go. Keith, you remember that you keep a gun in the top drawer of the dresser. You pull it out, pump it once and shoot me right between the eyes. 

KEITH palms the gun and aims it like he’s Kojack.

KEITH
This gun looks so real, Billy.

BILLY
That’s because it is real and there’s real blanks in it, too.

KENNY
That thing’s real?

KEITH
I don’t know about this. Shooting a real gun kind of gives me the willies.

BILLY
Go ahead, give it a practice shot.

KEITH
Really? Where should I aim it?

BILLY
It doesn’t matter, Keith. They’re blanks.

KEITH
Oh yeah.

He aims the gun at KENNY and fingers the trigger.

KENNY jumps.

KENNY
Hey, whoa. Not at me. Out of all the places, why would you pick me?

BILLY
Just aim it at the ground, Keith.

KEITH points the gun down and fires. 

BILLY (CONT’D)
See? That’s all there is to it. 

KEITH, clearly enjoying the catharsis of shooting a gun, places the pistol back into the drawer.

BILLY (CONT’D)
And remember the climactic line: ‘You’re worth more dead.’

KENNY
That’s the last line?

BILLY
Yeah. Is there a problem?

KENNY
It doesn’t really make sense.

BILLY
Kenny, who’s the director?

KENNY
You, but...

BILLY
Rule #1 of movie set etiquette: never second-guess the director. Especially a director related to whom?

KENNY
(rolling his eyes)
Bruce Lee.

BILLY
Right. So do we still have a problem?

KENNY
No.

BILLY
OK. You guys ready to do this?

KEITH AND KENNY
Yahp.

BILLY
All right. Quiet on the set. 

He runs up to the camera and turns it on. 

BILLY
Rolling! Places everyone! 

BILLY scoots out of the garage and positions himself at the edge of the door. 
He sucks in a deep breath and exhales. His hand pulls a blank tape out of his coat, opens his camera (the prop) and pops it in.

A thin layer of perspiration starts to form around his Hitler mustache. His eyes momentarily take on a worried look, but quickly compose themselves and get into character.

Slowly pressing the red ‘record’ button on the camera he yells:

BILLY
ACTION!!!

KEITH and KENNY wear forced looks of fear. They back up slowly until they can’t go any further.

KEITH
We’re trapped!

BILLY takes a step into the doorway, video camera to his eye.

KENNY
We’re finished!

KEITH puts his finger up in the air as though he’s just thought of something. He opens the drawer behind him and pulls out the pistol.

BILLY shuts his eyes.

KEITH
You’re worth more dead!

He fires right at BILLY’S head.

BILLY collapses.

KEITH tries to stay in character but cannot control a slight smirk from revealing itself.
After a moment, KEITH looks at KENNY. They’re both unsure whether they should cut or not.

KENNY
Is that...good, Billy?

A puddle of blood starts flowing out from underneath BILLY’S head.

KEITH
Billy?

KEITH walks slowly toward him.

KEITH (CONT’D)
Billy, you all right?

He crouches down and rolls BILLY over.

There is a four-inch hole in the center of his forehead oozing with blood. 

Whiteness surges into KEITH’S face.


EXT. BILLY’S DRIVEWAY. NIGHT

Flashing ambulance lights.

Police tape blocks the way into the ‘crime’ scene.

Two EMTs carry a stretcher bearing BILLY’S carcass. 

BILLY (V.O.)
One blank for rehearsal and one cop-killer for instant death. I know I said I would let fate guide my future...but, I don’t know, sometimes fate needs a little guidance itself.


INT. NEWS STUDIO. NIGHT

A NEWS ANCHOR reports on BILLY’S mysterious death.

BILLY (V.O.)
At first, they saw everything as another amateur Jackass stunt gone sour...


INT. POLICE STATION. DAY

KEITH and KENNY, both traumatized and disheveled, talk to two POLICE OFFICERS.

BILLY (V.O.)
... but I knew I could rely on Keith and Kenny to tell the real story...well, what they thought was the real story.

A newspaper lies sprawled out on one of the OFFICER’S desks. A headline reads “Dreams of Filmmaking Backfire.” Next to it is a small photograph of BILLY halfway into its negative state (for the melodramatic effect).

BILLY (V.O.)
A few papers around the nation thought my story was newsworthy, and unraveled it in a few feature articles.

A SECRETARY reads a tabloid in one of the station’s cubicles.

On the front page, we see a large photograph of BILLY’S garage. Cropped in the center is a low-quality photo of BILLY taken from one of the cameras seconds before he was shot. The headline reads, “THE CURSE CLAIMS ANOTHER LEE.”

BILLY (V.O.)
But once the tabloids found out I could be traced back to the Lee family, my story spread like rabbits. 

One page has photos of BRUCE, BRANDON and BILLY LEE.

BILLY (V.O.)
Bruce, Brandon and me, Billy...all three actors killed mysteriously...Brandon and I in the same manner. 

A headline on another page reads, “The 27 Curse.” We see pictures of Jim Morrison, Jimmy Hendrix, Curt Cobain and Billy.

BILLY (V.O.)
And once they milked that angle dry, they exploited my age. Morrison, Hendrix, Cobain, Lee...they added me to the list of musicians who died at 27. 
(laughing)
Of course, this made no sense. I didn’t even play an instrument. But they were so desperate to sensationalize my story.

We see rows of before-and-after pictures of BILLY’S death cropped along the page in comic-book fashion.

BILLY (CONT’D)
They got a hold of the footage from the camera I was holding when I was shot. It was the best stuff they’d printed since the Columbine pictures...


INT. A BASEMENT. NIGHT

A few TEENAGERS gathered around a computer watch the footage of BILLY’S death.

BILLY (V.O.)
...and the video became the most watched thing on the internet since Tommy and Pamela.


INT. DEPARTMENT STORE - ELECTRONICS. DAY

Hands continually grab copies of a DVD compilation entitled, “’You’re Better off Dead’: Man with a Video Camera and other films by Billy Lee.” They’re spread out on a ‘New Releases’ shelf.  

BILLY (V.O.)
A couple months later, Keith and Kenny sold my films to Criterion Collection for 5 million apiece. Four short films and an hour-long documentary of my life (featuring exclusive footage of my death, of course). To this date, no DVD has exceeded mine in sales. 

FADE TO BLACK.


INT. TV STUDIO. DAY (FANTASY SEQUENCE)

BILLY, wearing his gaudy clothing, sits in the hot seat across from the INTERVIEWER.

INTERVIEWER
Well, Billy, do you think it was worth it to...well, essentially kill yourself at such a young age?

BILLY
Well, you know, I often ask myself that question. And every time, I figure, “better to die young and live forever than to die old and never live.”

The INTERVIEWER’S jaw drops and he sits back slowly in his chair. He starts shaking his head in awe.

BILLY turns away from the INTERVIEWER, looks into the studio camera and smiles.


THE END


 


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